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Penguin Modern 1 and 2 – Voices from the Sixties #mlk

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I have to confess that I was a little hesitant and nervous about opening the lovely box set of Penguin Modern books kindly gifted to me by the three Offspring for Mother’s Day; it’s so pretty and I wanted to keep it nice etc etc etc (silly, I know, because books are to be read). However, on 4th April, as well as being Youngest Child’s birthday, it was also the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jnr. I started the day watching a recording of the ceremony from last November at Newcastle University where a statue of Dr. King was unveiled; and realised that as book 1 of the Penguin Modern set was his “Letter from Birmingham Jail”, I’d better get the set open and read the book that day. Which I did, and it seemed totally appropriate to do so. Also fascinating to note that Newcastle University had awarded Dr. King an honorary degree back in 1967 – how forward-thinking of them!

Moderns 1 and 2 are both by authors who would be considered to be connected with the 1960s (although of course Allen Ginsberg had been writing for much longer; but he will forever be connected with the sixties counterculture, particularly in this country because of the Royal Albert Hall poetry reading). And in many ways these are disparate authors, although reading them alongside each other was actually quite thought-provoking. So, a few of my thoughts on the first two books in the box.

Penguin Modern 1 – Letter from Birmingham Jail by Martin Luther King, Jr.

That’s Birmingham, Alabama, of course, and not the one in our Midlands… King was arrested while protesting against the treatment of his people in Birmingham and wrote this letter in the margins of a newspaper whilst confined.

I’ve never read King before; but obviously I know him as a great and articulate orator, and this is carried over into his writing. He’s clear, concise, reasoned yet impassioned. The “Letter” takes to task fellow religious leaders who argued against taking direct action in the streets to end segregation; and King states quite clearly how the legal route has failed, how his people are sick of the racial prejudice and sick of being treated so badly. Frankly, it’s amazing that they had waited so long before taking direct action and I couldn’t help feeling anger at the so-called religious men who failed to take action.

… I am compelled to carry the gospel of freedom beyond my own home town.

King is an erudite commentator and it actually terrifies me to realise how recently this kind of racial segregation was in place, and also how easy it still is to stir up distrust amongst peoples of different race and creed. If we could all only take on board Dr. King’s messages, maybe the world would be a better place.

The book also comes with an extract from one of Dr. King’s sermons, “The Three Dimensions of a Complete Life”.

Penguin Modern 2 – Television Was a Baby Crawling Toward That Deathchamber by Allen Ginsberg

In what would seem like a complete contrast, Penguin Modern 2 is a book of poetry, taken from Allen Ginsberg’s collected works. Ginsberg was one of the original Beats – friend (and sometimes lover) of Jack Kerouac and Neal Cassady – but he was the one who survived, continuing to write up until his death in 1997. I first discovered his work in the late 1970s when I began to explore the work of the Beats; in those days it was virtually impossible to buy copies of his books in provincial England, but my absolutely marvellous local library actually had a copy of his masterwork “Howl” so I was able to read him.

PM2 doesn’t contain “Howl” of course, but a selection of his well-know works features. The collection opens with “Pull My Daisy”, co-authored with Kerouac and Cassady, and from the film of that name (shhhh – have a little search online and you can find the film for a wonderful slice of Beat history.) Other well-known titles are “A Supermarket in California”, “America” and of course the title poem.

America why are your libraries full of tears?

On the surface, you might not connect King and Ginsberg. But both were fighting for freedoms – King on racial grounds, Ginsberg on sexual (and actually possibly any ground going, as he hated restrictions of any kind). Ginsberg was against prejudice of all sorts and in fact he and King actually met a couple of times.

Ginsberg’s verses are free-form, explorative, often profane, stimulating and it was a wonderful experience to re-encounter them after a looooong time. Nowadays, I find reading the Beats more problematic than I did in my youth; I’m less tolerant of the undercurrent of misogyny and feel more critical of their treatment of women. But when their prose and poetry soars I can forget that for a while and relish their words and their searches for freedom.

******

So Penguin Moderns 1 and 2 turn out to be an inspired pairing. These two voices from the past still have so much to say to us and I wouldn’t have necessarily chosen to pick up either of these authors at the moment without the prompting of the box – but I’m really glad I did. Looking through the names of the authors featured in the series, I think I’m going to have many joys to come – for which thanks! to the three Offspring! :))))

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A little taster… #penguinmodern @Bryan_S_K @classicpenguins

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Four Russian Short Stories by Gazdanov and Others
Penguin Modern: 21 – Translated by Bryan Karetnyk

OK, time for a little confession… Before I received the lovely Penguin Moderns box set, and when I wasn’t sure when it was coming out and if I’d actually get it, I may just have picked up a few of them in my local Waterstones (who did a lovely display of them – I got inordinately excited about spotting Penguin Moderns ‘In the Wild’!!!) – and here they are:

All of these are titles I wanted to read anyway, and I don’t mind having extra copies. But in advance of a review I have going live on Thursday, I thought I would dip into the Four Russian Short Stories volume. These are all works by émigré writers and it’s interesting that of the four featured, it’s the name of Gaito Gazdanov that appears on the cover; testament, I suppose, to the success of Pushkin Press’s rediscovery of his work over recent years.

The stories are translated by the ever-industrious Bryan Karetnyk, who was responsible for the marvellous “Russian Emigre Short Stories from Bunin to Yanovsky”, which I reviewed for Shiny New Books. Three of the stories featured here are also in that book, but very excitingly this little volume features a newly translated gem in the form of “A Miracle” by Yury Felsen. First published in 1934, this evocative story is set in a clinic where the narrator is bored whilst recuperating. Forced into the company of a rather troubling nurse, he is initially relieved to have a room-mate, although the latter turns out to be taciturn and no company at all. However, on the room-mate’s day of discharge a few home truths are told and the final denouement is perhaps unexpected.

My rule is to agree, not to argue, not to object. That way, the outside world remains somehow acceptable: I haven’t the energy to fight. Sometimes, with no good cause, I hope that everything will clear up…

I read this story after finishing my Thursday book and interestingly found that it resonated strongly with the feelings I had about that particular volume. Specifically, I keep returning to the drifting quality of émigré life, the detachment of the protagonists, and their sense of ennui as well as often despair.

There will be more on this subject in Thursday’s post, but if you want an introduction to Russian émigré writing this is definitely a great place to start. One of the things which please me about the “Russian Emigre…” volume was the gender balance and the fact that there were a goodly number of women writers featured; I’m glad to see that this has been carried over to PM21 as there is a 50:50 split. As well as Gazdanov and Felsen, the other stories are by Nina Berberova and Galina Kuznetsova, and all are excellent.

I’ll leave you a quote from Gazdanov which will give you an idea of the quality of the writing here – more émigré writing to come later this week!

The February dusk fell, plunging Paris into the icy darkness typical of this time of year, and night shrouded everything that had just taken place. Afterwards, it began to seem as if none of this had ever happened, as if it had all been an apparition, eternity’s brief intrusion into the historical reality in which we just happened to live, uttering foreign words in a foreign tongue, not knowing where we were headed, having forgotten whence we came.

 

April plans, high excitement at the Ramblings, new arrivals – and 1977! #iconoclasm

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Reading plans? Ha! Not a thing I’ve been doing over the recent year or so, which has worked well for my reading psyche; but I think I might have to be a tiny bit more organised during April, particularly as this is imminent:

Yes, it’s only a couple of weeks until Simon and I co-host the 1977 Club; and as I’m still afloat (just!) in a sea of review books, I obviously need to get focused so that I can have some 1977 reading in place too. Mind you, complications have set in because of the unexpected arrival of some lovely volumes at the Ramblings – I think the place is definitely turning into some kind of book magnet…

First up, OH surprised me with an unexpected Easter present, which was very lovely of him and it’s a lovely thing:

It’s a very gorgeous, illustrated edition of “Ulysses”, as you can see – the ‘Dublin Illustrated Edition’, no less and the pen and ink drawings inside are very striking indeed; here’s one:

“Ulysses” is on my reading bucket list, and I think OH was prompted by my watching of a documentary on Joyce recently (yes, documentaries again!). This particular edition is a lovely hardback with a decent sized type and so I think this will be readable and handleable. So maybe 2018 will finally be the year of “Ulysses”…

Next up, yesterday also saw the belated arrival of my Mothers’ Day gift from the three Offspring. They asked what I wanted and instead of listing lots of little bits and bobs, I said can I have this please?

Lo and behold! Here it is – the Penguin Moderns boxed set! Such joy! 50 little volumes of wonderfulness in a gorgeous box – I am *so* lucky (and I do have very well-trained children…)

The trouble is, I feel a Project Lurking – that of reading them from 1 to 50 and posting on each volume. Knowing my record with reading projects (Penguin Modern Poets, anyone? yes, I know I’ve fallen off the wagon a bit there) I suspect I would get distracted half way through. But it’s sooooooo tempting…

But yesterday also brought the Most Exciting Arrival in the form of this – “Iconoclasm in revolutionary Paris” by Prof Richard Clay:

Those of you who are concentrating (pay attention at the back there, please!) may recall me rabbitting on about this book after Christmas, as it’s been impossible to get hold of a copy and I had to resort to getting one of my Offspring to borrow a copy from the university in which they work. I’ve still been fairly desperate to own a copy (as a rapid read over Christmas was *really* not doing it justice), and so I went into overdrive when one of the many alerts I’d set up with online booksellers pinged into my inbox saying it was available at a More Reasonable Price than hitherto – followed by more and more alerts! A quick search revealed that the book appears to have been reprinted because there are lots more out there – and as the last copy I saw online was almost £1,500 (and a used annotated one at that), the price I had to pay for this was payable. And it arrived yesterday and I was unreasonably excited all day. Here it is, on some piles with which it might possibly have connections:

And here it is again, standing smartly on the shelf where it will eventually sit for good, with some related publications of interest:

I have had to make a new space on what you might call the Pending Shelves for some of the incomings and here are the newbies all together:

And do you know what? I’m actually going to take a little bit of credit for the republication of this, because I *did* actually send several nagging emails to the publishers pointing out that it’d be sensible to do a reprint, bearing in mind the vast amounts being charged online for old tatty copies. Looks like they listened! I said in my previous post “I would like to *own* a copy of this one, but that ain’t happening any time soon by the look of things…” – I guess everything comes to she who waits! 🙂

However, I’m afraid those aren’t the only books which have arrived recently at the Ramblings. I might have got carried away with some online offers:

I’ve been really enjoying the “Civilisations” series on BBC2 recently, so when I saw Mary Beard’s tie in book on offer I snapped it up – and I added “Utopia” on to get free shipping. I had a copy of “Utopia” once back in the day, but I either haven’t got it still or just can’t find it – either scenario is plausible given my record of mislaying books. I loved Binet’s “HHhH” and I’m equally intrigued by the idea of “The 7th Function of Language”. I’ve resisted up until now but too many recent reviews made me give in. And the John Muir book has been on my wishlist for *ages* and it was payday and I thought “WTF life is too short” and clicked. “Utopia” is potentially causing me brain strain, as I have a sort of “Utopian Reading List” put together by “The Happy Reader” and the thought of a Utopian reading project is doing my head in. Book addict? Moi? Ahem…

Fortunately I’ve been able to exercise more restraint in the charity shops and only these have come home with me recently (as well as the GAD collection I posted about recently):

The Camus, of course, had to come home – I don’t think I’ve ever seen it before. And the Penguin Story is just lovely, an old history of one of my favourite publishers with gorgeous old-fashioned illustrations. The Marina Warner was essential too (did you notice another one of hers lurking in an earlier picture in this post?) I read a lot of Warner back in my 20s and I’m keen to read more.

Ok. Phew. I think that’s it. I’ve just finished reading a review book which I’ll cover in the next few days and which was just marvellous; plus I have some Shiny New Books reviews coming up too, which I will link to. What I actually pick up to read next is another matter. OH suggested I should perhaps pace myself with “Ulysses”, just reading a section each day alongside something else, and I may well try that. Who knows – watch this space… 🙂

Meanwhile, Happy Easter to those of you who celebrate – make use of the lovely break from work, if you have one, by doing plenty of reading! 🙂

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