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Penguin Little Black Classics

This page collects together yet another of my Penguin Reading Projects – the Little Black Classics. These were released in the latter part of the 2010s, and I by no means have a full collection. I have, however, read a fair few of the ones I own as at January 2021!

Listed below are the titles, and where I’ve reviewed them there’s a link. Italicised titles are ones I don’t yet own and I will update these as I acquire them. The series features some excellent authors and is a brilliant way to get into the classics!

1. Mrs Rosie and the Priest – Giovanni Boccaccio
2. As kingfishers catch fire – Gerard Manley Hopkins
3. The Saga of Gunnlaug Serpent-tongue
4. On Murder Considered as One of the Fine Arts – Thomas De Quincey
5. Aphorisms on Love and Hate – Friedrich Nietzsche
6. Traffic – John Ruskin
7. Wailing Ghosts – Pu Songling – review here
8. A Modest Proposal – Jonathan Swift
9. Three Tang Dynasty Poets
10. On the Beach at Night Alone – Walt Whitman
11. A Cup of Sake Beneath the Cherry Trees – Kenko – review here
12. How to Use Your Enemies – Baltasar Gracián
13. The Eve of St Agnes – John Keats
14. Woman Much Missed – Thomas Hardy
15. Femme Fatale – Guy de Maupassant
16. Travels in the Land of Serpents and Pearls – Marco Polo
17. Caligula – Suetonius
18. Jason and Medea – Apollonius of Rhodes
19. Olalla – Robert Louis Stevenson
20. The Communist Manifesto – Karl Marx & Friedrich Engels
21. Trimalchio’s Feast – Petronius
22. How a Ghastly Story Was Brought to Light by a Common or Garden Butcher’s Dog – Johann Peter Hebel
23. The Tinder Box Hans – Christian Andersen
24. The Gate of the Hundred Sorrows – Rudyard Kipling
25. Circles of Hell – Dante
26. Of Street Piemen – Henry Mayhew
27. The nightingales are drunk Hafez
28. The Wife of Bath – Geoffrey Chaucer
29. How We Weep and Laugh at the Same Thing – Michel de Montaigne
30. The Terrors of the Night – Thomas Nashe
31. The Tell-Tale Heart Edgar – Allan Poe
32. A Hippo Banquet – Mary Kingsley
33. The Beautifull Cassandra – Jane Austen
34. Gooseberries – Anton Chekhov – review here
35. Well, they are gone, and here must I remain – Samuel Taylor Coleridge
36. Sketchy, Doubtful, Incomplete Jottings – Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
37. The Great Winglebury – Duel Charles Dickens
38. The Maldive Shark – Herman Melville
39. The Old Nurse’s Story – Elizabeth Gaskell
40. The Steel Flea – Nikolay Leskov – review here
41. The Atheist’s Mass – Honoré de Balzac
42. The Yellow Wall-Paper – Charlotte Perkins Gilman
43. Remember, Body… – C.P. Cavafy
44. The Meek One – Fyodor Dostoevsky –review here
45. A Simple Heart – Gustave Flaubert
46. The Nose – Nikolai Gogol – review here
47. The Great Fire of London – Samuel Pepys
48. The Reckoning – Edith Wharton
49. The Figure in the Carpet – Henry James
50. Anthem for Doomed Youth – Wilfred Owen
51. My Dearest Father Wolfgang-  Amadeus Mozart
52. Socrates’ Defence – Plato
53. Goblin Market – Christina Rossetti
54. Sindbad the Sailor
55. Antigone – Sophocles
56. The Life of a Stupid Man – Ryūnosuke Akutagawa – review here
57. How Much Land Does A Man Need? – Leo Tolstoy – review here
58. Leonardo da Vinci – Giorgio Vasari
59. Lord Arthur Savile’s Crime – Oscar Wilde
60. The Old Man of the Moon – Shen Fu – review here
61. The Dolphins, the Whales and the Gudgeon – Aesop
62. Lips too chilled – Matsuo Bashō – review here
63. The Night is Darkening Round Me – Emily Brontë
64. To-morrow – Joseph Conrad
65. The Voyage of Sir Francis Drake Around the Whole Globe – Richard Hakluyt
66. A Pair of Silk Stockings – Kate Chopin – review here
67. It was snowing butterflies – Charles Darwin
68. The Robber Bridegroom – Brothers Grimm
69. I Hate and I Love – Catullus
70. Circe and the Cyclops – Homer
71. Il Duro – D. H. Lawrence
72. Miss Brill – Katherine Mansfield – review here
73. The Fall of Icarus – Ovid
74. Come Close – Sappho
75. Kasyan from the Beautiful Lands – Ivan Turgenev – review here
76. O Cruel Alexis – Virgil
77. A Slip under the Microscope – H. G. Wells
78. The Madness of Cambyses – Herodotus
79. Speaking of Śiva
80. The Dhammapada
81. Lady Susan – Jane Austen
82. The Body Politic Jean-Jacques Rousseau
83. The World is Full of Foolish Men – Jean de la Fontaine
84. The Sea Raiders – H.G. Wells
85. Hannibal – Livy
86. To Be Read at Dusk – Charles Dickens
87. The Death of Ivan Ilyich – Leo Tolstoy
88. The Stolen White Elephant – Mark Twain
89. Tyger, Tyger – William Blake
90. Green Tea – Sheridan Le Fanu
91. The Yellow Book
92. Kidnapped – Olaudah Equiano
93. A Modern Detective – Edgar Allan Poe
94. The Suffragettes
95. How To Be a Medieval Woman – Margery Kempe
96. Typhoon – Joseph Conrad
97. The Nun of Murano – Giacomo Casanova
98. A terrible beauty is born – W.B. Yeats
99. The Withered Arm – Thomas Hardy
100. Nonsense – Edward Lear
101. The Frogs – Aristophanes
102. Why I Am so Clever – Friedrich Nietzsche
103. Letters to a Young Poet – Rainer Maria Rilke
104. Seven Hanged – Leonid Andreyev
105. Oroonoko – Aphra Behn
106. O frabjous day! – Lewis Carroll
107. Trivia: or, the Art of Walking the Streets of London – John Gay
108. The Sandman – E. T. A. Hoffmann
109. Love that moves the sun and other stars – Dante
110. The Queen of Spades – Alexander Pushkin
111. A Nervous Breakdown – Anton Chekhov
112. The Book of Tea – Kakuzo Okakura
113. Is this a dagger which I see before me? – William Shakespeare
114. My life had stood a loaded gun – Emily Dickinson
115. Daphnis and Chloe – Longus
116. Matilda – Mary Shelley
117. The Lifted Veil – George Eliot
118. White Nights – Fyodor Dostoyevsky
119. Only Dull People Are Brilliant at Breakfast – Oscar Wilde
120. Flush – Virginia Woolf
121. Lot No. 249 – Arthur Conan Doyle
122. The Rule of Benedict
123. Rip Van Winkle – Washington Irving
124. Anecdotes of the Cynics
125. Waterloo – Victor Hugo
126. Stancliffe’s Hotel – Charlotte Brontë
127. The Constitution of the United States

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