If you’re on social media, you might have noticed a recent flurry of mad book buying in support of the lovely indie publisher, Salt. I was happy to pitch in to their #justonebook initiative because I love indie publishers – they’re friendly, approachable, produce wonderful books, are happy to deal with bloggers and keep the mainstream publishers on their toes by always taking risks and publishing works that might not end up in print elsewhere.

When I whizzed onto their site, I wasn’t quite sure what I was going to pick up, as there’s such a wonderful selection of works. I’m quite awash with fiction at the moment, so I had a browse through their poetry section to see if there was anything which caught my eye. For some reason, Tim Cockburn’s “Appearances in the Bentinck Hotel” (first published in 2011) appealed – I can’t remember now if it was the cover, or a quote, or what – but I like slim volumes of poetry and so this one was the one I went for.

Cockburn is a completely new poet to me, and I haven’t been able to find out much about him online; in fact, this may be the only volume he’s published, although his works have featured in a number of journals, such as “Five Dials”. If that’s actually the case, it’s a great shame because I really did connect very strongly with his writing.

My tenderness has trodden on a three-pin plug.

The book contains 18 poems which range over the usual subjects such as life, love and loss; Cockburn is realistic yet romantic, and his works often touch an unexpected nerve despite what appears a deceptive simplicity.

I wondered whether I had such an empathy with the words because Cockburn often seems to be channelling his inner Philip Larkin – and of course I do love the latter’s poetry very much. Although his voice ranges far and wide (and “Immediately on Waking”,  a father’s dream about his grown-up daughters, was a particular stand-out) he often returns to Larkin as a touchstone; the last work in the book, entitled “A Girl in Winter” (after Philip’s novel) is very poignant.

So my Salty purchase turned out to be an excellent choice. Cockburn’s verses are still lodged in my brain quite a while after reading, and this collection has earned its place on my-ever growing poetry shelf. If Cockburn hasn’t published another collection I’m sorry about that, though I’m going to have a bit of an online dig – and I think I might well be exploring the Salt poetry books as well…

(I *have* managed to find a short, shaky video of Cockburn reading some of his poetry on YouTube, but nothing else really. A great shame – I like his work here a lot!)

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