Four Days’ Wonder by A.A. Milne

Way back in the mists of time (well – 2012!) I stumbled across a rather lovely Golden Age crime novel by A.A. Milne (who I’d previously only really known as the creator of Pooh, Tigger and co). “The Red House Mystery” turned out to be Great Fun, and I was keen to explore of Milne’s adult works (and in fact do have volumes of it knocking around the house somewhere…) However, one title I really wanted to read and which proved elusive was “Four Day’s Wonder”, a spoof of the genre, and I couldn’t find a copy at the time so it lurked on the back burner of the mental wishlist for years.

Fast forward six years and I was browsing on The Book People’s website, as they would keep sending me nagging emails reminding me that I had book points to spend, and I can never resist the idea of a free book…. Well, it transpired that they had a lovely set of 5 of Milne’s adult books for a Very Reasonable Price, and that set included “Four Days’ Wonder”. The inevitable happened (and I know I’m not the only one who succumbed – stand up, HeavenAli!) – and I decided to read the book straight away because after all, I’d wanted it for ages! ๐Ÿ™‚

“Four Days’ Wonder” is indeed set over four days in the life of Jenny Windell; a naive 18 year old orphan (how much more worldly would most 18-year-old girls be nowadays!!), she revisits her old home whilst in a bit of a dream, and stumbles across the dead body of her wild aunt Jane, whom she hasn’t seen for ages. Jane, an actress, seems to have been the black sheep of the family, with scandalous rumours doing the rounds about her drug taking and playing the harp naked.

So what does a sensible girl do? Instead of calling the police, she makes the mistake of tampering with the evidence and then decides to go on the run. With the aid of her best friend Nancy (a fellow fantasist), she changes her identity, hikes off into the country, and attempts to evade the law. Meanwhile, the wonderfully named and wonderfully inept Inspector Marigold attempts to solve his first murder case, focusing initially on the Parracots, the tenants of Jenny’s old house who discover the body. The sequences where the Inspector is first interviewing Mr. Parracot sparkle with wit, and that’s repeated throughout the book.

Mrs. Watterson sighed and said nothing. She had been married for fifty years, and knew that men would always go on being children. This accounted for War and Politics and Sport, and so many things.

Meanwhile, Jenny has various encounters in the countryside, including one Derek Fenton; she and Derek are instantly taken with each other, and Derek takes the runaway under his wing. Coincidentally, Nancy is working as secretary to Derek’s elder brother, Archibald, a successful (if corpulent) novelist. All the various parties become embroiled in the murder and as the plot strands come together it remains to be seen if Inspector Marigold will solve the murder, if Derek is in love with Jenny or Nancy, and who exactly did kill Aunt Jane!

Caroline was twenty-three, but not beautiful. The General looked over The Times at her across the breakfast-table, and felt uneasily that her face was familiar in some damn way; as indeed it was, for he had shaved something like it every morning for years.

“Four Days’ Wonder” turned out to be a wonderful, fizzy read, full of witty dialogue, humorous situations – perfect for a light reading at this time of year and reminiscent of many a 1930s screwball comedy film. Milne is beautifully tongue in cheek, sending up the detective genre in the form of Inspector Marigold; the girl adventurer in Jenny and Nancy’s intriguing to cover their tracks; and even the romance novel comes in for a little bit of spoofing.

Archibald Fenton, too, is a wonderful creation and Milne is not averse to having a pop at the character of the author! However, the book does have the occasional harder edge, and is oddly touching at times; Jenny is obviously suffering from the lack of parents, having conversations in her head with her ‘Hussar’ (her deceased father whom she’d never known), and I did think that perhaps the older Derek (30 to her 18) was not only a potential partner but also something of an authority figure replacement.

But that’s by the by; “Four Days’ Wonder” has so much to recommend it. Yes, it’s frothy and light; yes, the coincidences are perhaps a little unlikely; but you just need to suspend disbelief and love the book for what it is – a funny, entertaining and utterly enjoyable distraction from the horrors of the modern world. And what’s lovely is that I have another four Milnes standing by when reality just gets to be too much…

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