Dawn’s Left Hand by Dorothy Richardson

It doesn’t take Sherlock Holmes to realise that I have slipped just a little behind with my read of Dorothy Richardson’s “Pilgrimage” sequence of novels. I seem to be struggling to fit in reading at the moment, in the aftermath of the intensity of the 1947 Club; however, the recent excellent BBC4 Virago documentary spurred me on to pick up volume 4 recently and tackle the next book in the sequence – “Dawn’s Left Hand”.

pilg-4

The book picks up pretty much where the previous one had left off, with Miriam travelling home from Oberland. She seems to be finding leaving Switzerland a wrench, and in fact the place and its effects permeate much of the early section of the book. As usual, Miriam finds it hard to relate to fellow travellers en route, but is often too kind to shun them.

Back in her familiar London she takes up her old life, in more ways than one. Early in the book she visits an old acquaintance, Dr. Densley, an old beau who seems to still hanker after Miriam. She’s still working at the dentist practice, and she makes a break with Selina, her co-tenant, to return to her old boarding house. The relationship between the two women, always vaguely defined at best, seems to have completely broken down and given the chance to up sticks Miriam takes it.

Into Miriam’s life comes a new friend in the form of a French woman, Amabel, who develops quite a passion for our heroine. They meet at Miriam’s club and it is clear that she is still mixing with the Lycurgans. However, Miriam is distracted by her affair with Hypo, which appears to come to some kind of fruition, resulting oddly enough in a gulf seeming to develop between her and the Wilsons. The book ends on a strange note, with a meeting on the steps of Mrs. Bailey’s that may or may not be a major one – perhaps the next book will reveal all!

“Dawn’s Left Hand” is another short entry in the Pilgrimage sequence, and I wondered if it was almost too short to stand on its own and that maybe it would have been better attached to “Oberland” (or may “Clear Horizon”, which comes next, but that remains to be seen). Again, so much of the book is Miriam’s emotions and reactions to things, her contemplating the distance between men and women, and her relishing her solitude once more. As usual, Richardson does her trick of dropping huge events (deaths, dramatic adventures of relatives) into the narrative as passing comments, so as to retain the focus on the narrator’s state of mind. We are treated to Miriam dipping into the first person now and then, and the affair with Hypo is so discreetly written that if you didn’t read carefully you might miss it. Miriam in many ways seems torn between Hypo and Amabel, and I presume the latter was based on her friend Veronica.

I wondered a little about the title and when I did some research online, came up with this quote from Omar Khayyam (translated by Edward Fitzgerald):

Dreaming when Dawn’s Left Hand was in the sky
I heard a Voice within the Tavern cry
‘Awake, my Little ones, and fill the Cup
Before Life’s Liquor in its Cup be dry

It made me think if this was a little reference to Miriam deciding to take life on and embark on the affair with Hypo before she became older and love might pass her by – certainly, as I may have said before, there is the risk with her rigidity that she cuts herself off slightly from human interaction and the sacrifice that entails and it will be intriguing to see where the story goes next.

As always, the descriptions of London were lovely and atmospheric, and I enjoyed much of the time I spent in Miriam’s company. However, I got the feeling this was something of a bridging book, taking Miriam into a new phase of her life with the Hypo affair and the introduction of Amabel. I’ll be interested to see where the story takes me next!

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