So, coming to the end of my reading for the 1947 Club I realised that I had only been reading books I already owned – which is great! However, I was faced with the few remaining titles I’d earmarked and I honestly didn’t feel like starting any of them. I started casting around for something else on the shelves, and decided to check out my Maigrets. I didn’t think I had any of the novels from 1947, but when I began to dig into short stories I found that two fact Penguin omnibus editions I own contained several short works from 1947 – result! I was just in the mood for Maigret and so the day was saved!

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In fact, as I investigated further, it transpired that one of the collections, “Maigret’s Christmas”, contained “Maigret in Retirement”, which is listed as a 1947 novel; the line between short story and novel is often blurred with Simenon as his novels tend to be quite short anyway, and several of these stories are pretty much novellas. Whatever – it meant I had another 6 titles from 1947 ready and waiting. I’m basing my dating of the stories on the copyright dates given at the start of the book – how accurate that is, is anybody’s guess but I’m claiming these stories for the 1947 Club!

So, on to the tales themselves. First up was Maigret’s Pipe, the short title piece of the first of the two books. I actually read this and mentioned in briefly in the early days of the Ramblings, and it’s a satisfying story which really captures the essence of Maigret. Like so many of his investigations, this once comes about by chance circumstances; whilst being consulted about a very trivial seeming occurrence, the detective’s favourite pipe disappears and in following up this mystery Maigret is led onto a much larger crime which might not have otherwise been discovered.

In Maigret and the Surly Inspector, we encounter Lognon, a recurring detective in the books. Married to an invalid wife and with a constant run of back luck, here an apparent suicide takes place in his district. However, Maigret was on hand when the report came through to the police call centre, and he’s intrigued enough to follow it up. Running the investigation from behind scenes as tactfully as he can, he reveals that the suicide is most definitely not what it seems. Maigret’s long personal experience is helpful here, as it is in The Evidence of the Altar Boy. Again, there is an apparently unimportant report, an altar boy claiming to have seen a body which miraculously disappears. However, Simenon’s sleuth is able to draw on his own experience as an altar boy to get into the mindset of the young man and solve the mystery.

There are always little quirks in the stories that set off the investigation, and in The Most Obstinate Customer in the World this is simply the oddness of a customer who sits in a cafe from morning to night doing absolutely nothing. Simenon cleverly throws you straight into the action with eye-witness accounts, allowing the story to gradually unfold until the human drama behind the seemingly innocent action is revealed. And human quirks are also on display in Death of the Nobody where the murder victim is the most ordinary, regular man in the world – so why would anyone want to kill him? It takes all Maigret’s persistence and quiet determination to find out the truth.

My final 1947 read for the week was the novella Maigret in Retirement, which takes the detective very much out of his comfort zone. Maigret has indeed retired from the force and although he’s keeping his home in Paris, he’s currently in the country growing vegetables (shades of Poirot with his vegetable marrows and Holmes with his bee-keeping come to mind). However, into this relatively calm paradise explodes Bernadette Amorelle. The elderly head of a business family, she demands that Maigret comes immediately to her home to solve the mystery of the recent death of her granddaughter. Initially reluctant, Maigret finds himself drawn into her circle where he finds an old school friend made good. In fact, the whole milieu of money and status is one in which Maigret is always uncomfortable; but despite attempts to scare him off he digs into the past of the Amorelle family, revealing several shocking skeletons and bringing about a dramatic climax to the adventure.

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Simenon in Maigret pose!

I’m never disappointed in a Maigret story and I wasn’t here. The setting, the mysteries and the lovely ensemble cast (Janvier, Lucas, Torrence, Mme Maigret) can always be relied upon to intrigue and entertain. However, what really stood out during these readings was Simenon’s interest for the human drama and the story behind the crime. What starts off as something banal or fairly straightforward always morphs into something unusual or quirky, and Simenon and Maigret are always concerned for the people themselves and the situations they’re in which have caused their actions. At one point, Simenon has the detective refer to his “obstinacy, his intuition and his understanding of human nature” and I think it’s the latter that’s really his strength here, and what makes him such a fine detective. I’ve seen these books criticised for lack of character development, but that really isn’t the case. Maigret himself and all his colleagues are really well-rounded, believable characters, and all the additional players are brilliantly captured by Simenon’s pen; their loves, their hates, their everyday problems and irritations, the stupidity of their lives, the cruelty, cupidity and greed. Simenon and Maigret find joy in the simple and the everyday (witnessed, for example, by Maigret’s straightforward friendship with Raymonde, the serving girl at the inn where he stays while investigating the Amorelle family – he would rather eat a meal of eggs, sausage, cheese and bread in the kitchen with her than a fine gourmet meal with the cold and corrupt family in the big house). And Simenon’s descriptions bring alive whichever location the action’s set in, so that you’re walking in the dark in the country or through the rain in Paris alongside Maigret.

So a wonderful and satisfying set of stories to finish reading from 1947. It’s been a great week and I’ve really enjoyed each and every book I’ve chosen. I’ll do a little round up post tomorrow, but meanwhile don’t forget to link any of your reviews so I can add these to the page!

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