Two more short stories by Kirill Bulychev

As you might have noticed, I was mightily impressed with the sci-fi short stories of Kirill Bulychev when I read his collection “Half a Life” recently. He was a very prolific author in his native language, but a quick search online revealed that not an awful lot of his works have been translated. However, I had a browse on the wonderful resource that is the Internet Speculative Fiction Database and found that there are some of his short stories in other collections and so I sent off for one that sounded particularly appealing – “World’s Spring”.

When it (finally) turned up, it was a lovely hardback edition – ex-library from the USA but in pretty condition despite that and the collection as a whole sounds really interesting. It’s one of the Macmillan Best of Soviet Sci Fi collections (as was “Half a Life”) and is translated by Roger DeGaris. The book is edited by Vladimir Gakov, apparently a sci-fi critic from the Soviet union, and he also provides a short introduction to each story. The volume is divided into four sections, entitled “Space: Amid the Stars – and on Earth”, “The Future – Fears and Hopes”, “Parallel Worlds: Space and Time” and “Aliens: Human and Nonhuman” . Bulychev’s two tales fall into the second and the last sections, and are just as good as the previous ones I’d read.

worlds spring

Bulychev really is a master storyteller, and in both stories he wrong-foots the reader from the beginning, not letting on quite who/what the protagonist is. In “An Ugly Bioform”, we meet (logically enough) a bioform – a human who has been surgically altered to survive extreme conditions on other planets and in other environments. Returning from his mission, he is somewhat alienated back on earth and unsure of his future until local events thrust him into a situation where his physical condition can be of use. The second story, “The Choice”, features someone who initially appears to be human, albeit with powers to change form and influence people. However, as the tale progresses it becomes clear that there is more to this person that meets the eye and they have a big decision to make about their future.

There is a consistent theme in both stories about belonging; whether you are a human originally or not a human, how much of your identity is defined by where you live and where you grew up? The stories explore these aspects of living very thoughtfully and Bulychev never hits you in the face with his message. Whilst celebrating simple human existence and the joys of life on earth, he shows the possibilities that could be out there in the universe. He also tells his story brilliantly, drawing you in and gradually revealing more about his characters and their setting until you’re completely involved in their fate – a real achievement in a short story. There’s a poignancy in both stories as we watch the characters wrestling with their circumstances and trying to make the right decision. In an era when the world is full of horrors, it’s timely to consider what it is to be a human being and what our responsibilities are to each other.

The introduction to the first story by Gakov is revealing; he discloses that Bulychev is the pseudonym of an academic and sings the praises of his prolific works, describing his work as “psychologically penetrating”. Of course, Wikipedia will tell you much, much more nowadays, but at the time of this book’s publication (1981) there was probably very little known in the west about the author. Gakov rates Bulychev highly, putting him as second only to the Strugatskys. I’ve probably not read enough of either of these to agree or disagree with that opinion, but I certainly rate Bulychev highly myself – and I fear another visit to the ISFDB may be due…. 🙂

(As an aside, this whole collection does look rather lovely – it contains a number of names I’m not familiar with, and when things are a little less frantic, I’ll spend some time exploring it!)

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